Marking Distracted Driving Awareness Month – IN DE AND PA, THE CASEY FELDMAN FOUNDATION’S EndDD.ORG BUILDS SUPPORT

Friday, April 19th, 2013

 

Casey's dad, Joel Feldman, speaking at the PA news conference

DE – L to R: State Police Superintendent Col. Nathaniel McQueen Jr., Joel Feldman, Governor Jack Markell, Lieutenant Governor Matthew Denn, Tim Lengkeek, President – Delaware Trial Lawyers, Lisa Donofrio, Executive Director, Delaware Trial Lawyers

With a Governor, Lt. Governor, Attorney General and state lawmakers joining the cause, EndDD.org reached out to drivers and their passengers in Delaware and Pennsylvania, especially teenagers, with an urgent and life-saving warning to change their driving habits and stop driving distracted.

In separate news conferences in Wilmington, DE and Harrisburg, PA last week, EndDD.org founder Joel Feldman told the story of his 21-year-old daughter Casey, who was killed by a distracted driver. Feldman and his wife, Dianne Anderson, created The Casey Feldman Foundation and EndDD.org, a project of the foundation, to honor Casey’s life and save others.

“While I can’t bring Casey back, I can tell her story so that teens and adults will drive safer,” said Feldman, who worked with traffic safety, mental health and other experts to develop the EndDD.org interactive presentation that will be seen by more than 200,000 teens in 35 states this year.

In Wilmington, Feldman and EndDD.org supporters were joined by Governor Jack Markell, Lt. Governor Matt Denn, and State Police Superintendent Colonel Nathaniel McQueen, Jr. at a news conference hosted by the Delaware Trial Lawyers Association. That day, the state launched its second wave of cellphone enforcement, issuing tickets to drivers seen talking or texting on a cell phone. The Delaware Office of Highway Safety reported 1,718 crashes in 2012 due to distracted driving, one was fatal. Governor Markell made it clear that his office is committed to seeing that every teen in Delaware participate in the EndDD presentation.

DE – L: Governor Jack Markell, Joel Feldman and Lt. Governor Matt Denn sporting EndDD wristbands

“I was amazed by how many Delaware trial lawyers attended the news conference and stayed for a training session afterwards so that they could go out in their own communities and educate young drivers about the dangers of distracted driving,” said Joel Feldman.

In Harrisburg, Feldman joined State Attorney General Kathleen Kane, Auditor General Eugene DePasquale, State Sen. Rob Teplitz, D-Dauphin County, Rep. Brandon Neuman, D-Washington and the Pennsylvania Association of Justice (PAJ). Sen. Teplitz and Rep. Neuman sponsored resolutions, passed unanimously in both houses, making April, “Distracted Driving Awareness Month.”

“Distracted driving takes a terrible toll on our families, communities and safety,” said Sen. Neuman. “It is my hope that educating everyone about the importance of safe driving habits will begin to change driving habits that caused 387,000 injuries and 3,331 deaths in 2011.”

“It is crucial to public safety that we continue to remind motorists to keep both eyes on the road and both hands on the wheel,” said Rep. Teplitz. “Just one moment of distraction can change the lives of not only a driver, but passengers, surrounding drivers and pedestrians, as well as their loved ones. No text message is worth risking lives.”

PA – L to R: Rep. Brandon Neuman , Mike Davey (PAJ), Joel Feldman, Scott Cooper (PAJ Pres.) and State Sen. Rob Teplitz

Rep. Teplitz praised Feldman and his family for “their leadership on this critical issue.”

“After he lost his daughter, Joel Feldman changed his own driving habits and committed himself to educating others nationwide about the dangers of distracted driving, especially teens,” Rep. Teplitz said.

“The (EndDD.org) presentation is heart-wrenching, powerful, and illuminating,” Sen. Neuman said. “It will challenge every mind and leave no heart untouched.”

Attorney General Kathleen Kane said, “It is critical that everyone, but especially teenagers who are just forming good driving habits that will last a lifetime, understands that driving while distracted is terrible dangerous…I am glad that the EndDD program is being show in high schools across Pennsylvania, and I’m proud to help make April “End Distracted Driving Month” in Pennsylvania.”

PA Attorney General Kathleen Kane speaking at the press conference

PAJ President Scott Cooper and Mike Davey, President of the News Lawyers Division of the PAJ, have committed their members to carry the EndDD program throughout the state.

Read more about the EndDD.org news conferences:

Pennsylvania:

Lawmakers, Victim’s Father Warn of Distracted Driving Dangers (Also view full video coverage of entire PA news conference here)

Father uses daughter’s story to tell dangers of distracted driving

Lawmakers, Victim’s Father Warn of Distracted Driving Dangers 

Father tries to prevent distracted driving (FOX News video)

PA Legislators recognize April as ‘Distracted Driving Awareness’ month  (News 21 video)

PA Auditor General Eugene DePasquale speaking at the news conference

 

 

 Delaware:

Father who lost daughter to distracted motorist leads effort

 

 

 

Distracted Driving Awareness Month guest contributor Joel Feldman: Celebrating my daughter’s 25th birthday

Wednesday, April 10th, 2013

Article by Joel Feldman, guest contributor, reprinted from the U.S. Secretary of Transportation (US.DOT), Ray Lahood’s official blog, Fast Lane:

Pink balloons were released to mark Casey's 25th birthday

Pink balloons were released to mark Casey’s 25th birthday

Apr 10, 2013 – This past weekend, on April 6, we celebrated my daughter Casey’s 25th birthday. But Casey wasn’t there. She was killed in 2009 by a distracted driver, a 58-year-old man behind the wheel of a van. He took his eyes off the road for just a few seconds. Pink was Casey’s favorite color, so we released pink balloons in her memory. As the balloons drifted upwards, I thought of her smile, the last time I heard her say “daddy,” how caring, compassionate, and loving she was, and her incredible zest for life. I also thought of her last moments, how she suffered, how afraid she must have been, and the last words she spoke before she died: “I want my mom.”

Following Casey’s death, our family established the Casey Feldman Foundation and created “End Distracted Driving.” We are keeping Casey’s memory alive through EndDD.org by raising awareness about distracted driving and changing driver behaviors – especially among young people. We want to spare other families from the suffering we have endured.

Two years ago, Casey became one of Secretary LaHood’s “Faces of Distracted Driving.” I created the video to share the story of Casey’s life and death with the world, and I was proud to see it become the first public submission in the “Faces” series.

Distracted Driving Awareness Month guest contributor Joel Feldman

Distracted Driving Awareness Month guest contributor Joel Feldman

Today, that same video is the centerpiece of EndDD.org’s Student Awareness Initiative. We worked with experts to develop this interactive presentation with the goal of changing driving attitudes and behaviors of teens and their parents. By the end of 2013, nearly 200,000 people – mostly teenagers – in more than 40 states will have participated in the EndDD.org program.

Nearly all the teens we work with tell me that their parents drive distracted with them in the car, and their friends’ parents do the same when they’re carpooling. I know I drove distracted with my children in the car before Casey was killed. That changed with her death.

I’m encouraged because what drivers consider acceptable behavior behind the wheel is starting to change, especially because of young people. They are “getting it” – much as an earlier generation learned the importance of using seat belts and convinced their parents to buckle up. Young people are working with moms and dads to adopt safe driving rules for the entire family. Young people are helping to change our entire driving culture.

People often tell me how brave I am to speak publicly about my daughter. But I don’t feel very brave. I just feel that I have to do this, so Casey’s life and death will make a difference for others.

It took Casey’s death for me to change the way I drive. But I hope it won’t take personal tragedies for others to get the message. I am optimistic we all can “get it”, even as we celebrate Casey’s birthday without her.

 

Casey’s Friend, Brooke Burdge, Shares Her Story with Local NJ Teens in Distracted Driving Presentation

Sunday, March 17th, 2013

The following is a guest blog by Brooke Burdge, a friend of Casey’s during her time at Fordham University.

 

Brooke Burdge with students from Monmouth Regional High School who are involved in efforts to help promote safe driving within their own school community.

On March 11, I had the opportunity to speak with close to 1,000 students and faculty at Monmouth Regional High School in Tinton Falls, New Jersey on the topic of distracted driving. My presentation was part of  the EndDD.org End Distracted Driving Student Awareness Initiative, which since its inception in 2012, has reached over 60,000 high school students.

At the start of my presentation, I gave a brief overview of EndDD’s mission, as well as some background on the inspiration for these presentations. I described how in the summer of 2009, an attorney and father named Joel Feldman from Pennsylvania got the news that his 21-year-old daughter, Casey, was struck and killed by a distracted driver while she was a pedestrian in a crosswalk on her way to her summer job in Ocean City, New Jersey. I told them how he then established the Casey Feldman Foundation in memory of his daughter and created EndDD.org  and the distracted driving presentation to educate others about the dangers of distracted driving.

Brooke (L) and Casey in a photo taken during their time together at Fordham University

Then, I let the group know a little more about me. Like them, I grew up in Monmouth County, NJ.  After graduating from a nearby high school in 2006, I went on to Fordham University, where I made a great friend named Casey.  This is the moment where I showed them a slide with photos of Casey and myself throughout our time together, as well as two Facebook wall posts from Casey. In this moment, the audience realized my direct connection to this cause and the root of my passion for this issue.

Later in the presentation, I showed the students the “Faces of Distracted Driving” video created for the U.S. Department of Transportation, in which a few of Casey’s friends and I talk about the preventable nature of Casey’s tragedy.  I explained to the students that you tend to see these types of videos and think, “Something like this couldn’t happen to me or my friends,” but those are all my good friends on that screen, and it’s very real to each of us.

Brooke (L) and Casey working for The Observer at the Fordham reunion in June 2008

Throughout the presentation, I reminded the group of three main points.  First, this is not just a teen problem. Adults are also guilty. I shared that before July 2009, I was also guilty of distracted driving. Secondly, I let them know that this is a choice. I wasn’t there to tell them what they should or should not be doing. I was there to give them information, and share a few stories, that they can take into consideration when making their own choices behind the wheel. And third, I reminded that that yes, these stories are sad, but they’re preventable. I wanted them to understand that although what happened to Casey and others they would hear about is extremely upsetting, it didn’t have to happen. I wanted everyone in the room to walk away feeling like they were in a position to help stop future tragedies like these from taking place.

Before the presentation, over 400 students had completed questionnaires about distracted driving. I covered the forms of distracted driving they had mentioned most frequently in their surveys—taking eyes off the road, texting, talking on the phone. But, I also wanted them to think more about the other kinds of distracted driving that may not come to mind as frequently, but are just as dangerous, such as eating, changing music, applying makeup, programing a GPS, and reaching for something.

Brooke Burdge speaking to students at Monmouth Regional High School in NJ. Photo Credit: Samantha Primich

We discussed the importance of speaking up for your own safety when a passenger in an adult’s or a friend’s car—how you can offer to take your driver’s phone and cover any calls or texts for them while their driving.  Through various stories about the numerous consequences of distracted driving, I hoped to drive home the point that this is sad, but preventable. Just a few seconds can change everything, and in the end, are those few seconds of distraction really worth the consequences?

I want to thank those faculty and students who helped organize this assembly.  Additionally, I want to thank every student and faculty member in that room for their attention.  A handful of students have reached out to me on social media since the assembly, and I am so happy that this presentation helped them think about distracted driving in a new light.

NOTE:  View photos from the presentation here. View Brooke Burdge and Casey’s other friends  in the Faces of Distracted Driving video below speaking about Casey and how they changed they driving habits after Casey’s death. View U.S. Secretary of Transportation, Ray LaHood’s blog article introducing the video.

Painting your toe nails while driving? Putting in contact lenses? Colorado teens speak up as CO Trial Lawyers join the EndDD effort

Saturday, February 2nd, 2013

By Dianne L. Anderson

 

Say what?! Yes, distracted driving comes in all shapes and as many colors as nail polish. In addition to the Casey Feldman Foundation’s philanthropy in awarding scholarships and grants to students and organizations, the Foundation is committed to ending distracted driving through its sponsored site, EndDD.org.

Casey Feldman was killed by a distracted driver in 2009 while crossing the street in a crosswalk at an intersection governed by 4-way stop signs. Joel Feldman, Casey Feldman’s father, is spreading the word nationwide and the Colorado Trial Lawyers Association  (CTLA) is just one of 13 state organizations (in addition to Canada) which has taken up the cause and has committed its members to taking the EndDD.org presentation to teens in their communities. Some 60,000 students nationwide have seen the presentation since its inception in the Spring of 2012 and Feldman estimates that some 200,000 will have seen it by the end of this year.

Feldman holds a picture of his daughter, Casey, while he discusses the dangers of distracted driving during a driver education class at Longmont High School on Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013.(Greg Lindstrom/Times-Call)

The presentation was developed by Joel Feldman with the help of researchers, traffic safety experts and teen messaging experts to maximize teen engagement.  Feldman has personally given the presentation to more than 7,000 teens across the country and has given 9 presentations in Colorado since January 9, 2013, reaching some 600 Colorado teens in the Denver, Boulder and Longmont area thus far. Joel is working with the CTLA to implement the program throughout the state and is providing training to its lawyers so that the message will continue to be spread.

As a result of his efforts in Colorado, Feldman received the CTLA 2013 Consumer Protection Award.  “CTLA is proud to honor Joel with the Consumer Protection Award,” said John Sadwith, executive director at CTLA.  “Joel and his wife, Dianne, share their tragedy to get teenagers thinking and their families talking about distracted driving.  Our members want to help them succeed in saving lives.”  Stated Feldman, “It is particularly gratifying to receive this award from the Colorado Trial Lawyers Association. Our son Brett will graduate from the University of Colorado Boulder this year and wants to make Colorado his permanent home.  My wife and I love the Boulder/Denver area where we have made many new friends since working with the University on a number of projects over the last 4 years.”

The EndDD presentation is comprehensive and covers all forms of distracted driving, not just cell phone usage, which is attributed to less than 1/4 of distracted driving crashes as of 2009 data.  “We do not want teens to have a false sense of security that if they are not using their cell phone, they are driving distraction free”, said Joel.

While teens across the country have recognized cell phone usage, eating, drinking, grooming, operating a GPS, talking to others in their vehicle and viewing roadside activity, as distractions, the Colorado teens added a few additional personal examples. Said one  teen, “My cousin is thin and very flexible and she actually had her foot up on the steering wheel and was painting her toenails as she was driving!  I was terrified.” Added another, “My mom was driving me while she put her contact lenses in her eyes! I was scared to death!”

Feldman has continued to affirm that distracted driving is not just a teen problem, but is everyone’s problem. “ In all of my presentations, the vast majority of the students report  that their parents drive distracted with them in the car. I have been so impressed with the Colorado teens who I have spoken with. They are bright, engaged and really want to drive safely. I am convinced that they will avoid many driving distractions and will also work to get their moms and dads to drive safer. Their generation will change our driving culture, just as our generation changed the culture regarding seat belt usage,” said Feldman.

Related Links:

EndDD.org (End Distracted Driving – Casey Feldman Foundation sponsored site)

Colorado Trial Lawyers Association – Community Outreach: Distracted Driving Program 

“Grieving father fights distracted driving in St. Vrain discussion”,  The Times Call, Longmont, CO 1-9-2013

“Reaching out in our communities to keep our children safe: The 2012-13 EndDD,org High School Distracted Driving Awareness Program”, by Joel D. Feldman,  Colorado Trial Lawyers Association Trial Talk,  Aug/Sept 2012

United States Department of Transportration/National Highway Traffic Administration (NHTSA),  “Distracted Driving 2009” Traffic Safety Facts Research Note,  Sept 2010

RI to Roll Out Casey Feldman Foundation/EndDD Distracted Driving Program to Reach Every Teen in State

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012

In a press conference on Wednesday, October 17th held at the State House in Providence, Rhode Island, Joel Feldman and Dianne Anderson joined trial lawyers and elected officials to announce an initiative that will result in every teen in Rhode Island seeing the Casey Feldman Foundation’s EndDD.org/60forSafety  distracted driving presentation. Rhode Island Association for Justice  President, Anthony Leone has made reaching out to the community to promote safety a  central part of his presidency. Trial lawyers across Rhode Island have committed to giving the  presentation in every high school in the state to  educate teens about distracted driving in an effort to save lives.

L: Joel Feldman, Rhode Island Governor Lincoln Chafee and Anthony Leone president of Rhode Island Association for Justice

Anthony Leone was joined by Rhode Island Governor Lincoln Chaffee, Speaker of the Rhode Island House of Representatives, Gordon Fox; Senate Judiciary Chair, Michael McCaffery, Joel Feldman and Dianne Anderson. There was incredible support for the program. Joel Feldman spoke about how he was inspired to create the program following Casey’s death caused by a distracted driver in 2009 .  Joel described the scientific nature of the presentation and the very successful pilot program in the spring of 2012 which resulted in more than 41,000 teens seeing the presentation. Joel said “all of Casey’s friends  have changed the way they drive as a result of Casey’s death. I have changed the way I drive as a result of Casey’s death-we created this program so that it would not take personal tragedies for all of us  to change the way we drive.

Joel Feldman speaking at the press conference as Governor Chafee looks on

Rhode Island is the first of a number of states’ trial lawyer organizations  to have their trial lawyers go into schools and talk with students about distracted driving. Through Joel’s tireless efforts, Kentucky, Indiana, New York, Massachusetts and Pennsylvania have announced similar plans and more states are signing on. It is  estimated that the program will reach more than 250,000 teens this year.

To find out about the program, participate as a speaker or arrange a presentation, send an e-mail to [email protected]. EndDD.org (End Distracted Driving) is the Casey Feldman Foundation’s sponsored site devoted to ending distracted driving.

Donate to the Casey Feldman Foundation so that we may continue with our worthy causes.
 

Related Links:

Photos from the press conference

EndDD.org – Casey Feldman Foundation’s sponsored site devoted to ending distracted driving

60 For Safety

Rhode Island Association for Justice

American Association for Justice

 

Distracted Driving Presentation Taken to Springfield High School

Thursday, July 5th, 2012

By Dianne L. Anderson

Bridget Clawson urging Mrs. Boeni to put down her cell phone

In a continuing effort to take the message of the dangers of distracted driving to students across the nation, Joel Feldman and Dianne Anderson spoke to students at Casey Feldman’s high school alma mater before school recessed for the summer. The presentation was introduced by Springfield High School (SHS ) SADD officer, Amrita Famachandran.

In the interactive presentation, students were made aware of the fact that distracted driving does not just involve cell phone use.  Putting on makeup, changing a CD, eating, reaching for drinks or items in the car, taking your hands off of the wheel for any reason and simply taking your eyes and mind off of the primary task of driving, are all distractions that can result in deadly consequences.  Students also saw firsthand, the negative cognitive impact of simply trying to carry on a cell phone conversation while driving. Many were surprised that having a cell phone conversation while driving is the cognitive equivalent to a blood alcohol limit of .08, or driving under the influence.   Students also participated in role playing to become comfortable as passengers asking a distracted driver to stop their distraction, be it putting down a cell phone or a drink.

SHS students,L to R: Paige Klaniecki, James Cella, Bridget Yingling, Hanna Feehery, Monica Fischer

Acknowledging that distracted driving is not simply a teen problem, students took home forms to be signed by them and their parents, agreeing to eliminate various distractions while behind the wheel.

To bring the message close to home, students also viewed the “Faces of Distracted Driving – Casey Feldman” video prepared for the U. S. Department of Transportation by Joel Feldman. Many of the students knew Casey or had older brothers and sisters who went to SHS with Casey.

Said graduating senior Bridget Clawson, “The program you did today was fantastic. I think it really got through to the kids because it wasn’t all facts and statistics and telling them what to do. You and Mr. Feldman really put the ideas out in a personable way that almost made it seem like I was in a classroom! Thank you for sharing you story with everyone, I think you really got through to a lot of kids at SHS.”

SHS SADD officer Amrita Famachandran and Joel Feldman

Through the Casey Feldman Memorial Foundation and its sponsored site EndDD.org (End Distracted Driving), over 40,000 students nationwide have seen the distracted driving presentation as a result of Joel Feldman organizing some 800 trial lawyers, judges, safety officials and friends to speak in their local communities. The beginning of the effort coincided with National Distracted Driving Awareness Month in April.  Joel Feldman has personally reached some 4,000 students alone in Pa, NJ, CO and MD.

According to Joel Feldman, “Through bringing awareness of the issue to students and their parents, we are saving lives and keeping Casey’s memory alive. If even one life is saved, it is more than worth the effort”.

Related Links:

Springfield High School (SHS)

SADD

Faces of Distracted Driving – Casey Feldman

EndDD.org (End Distracted Driving)

National Distracted Driving Awareness Month

 

 

2012 Student Distracted Driving Awareness Campaign

Monday, May 21st, 2012

After Casey’s death, one of her colleagues on her college newspaper told us that Casey taught her that everyone has a unique story and if you listened carefully enough you would hear that story. Telling one’s story and having someone really listen and hear that story can be powerful and can change both the story teller and the listener.

The story of the EndDD.org/60forsafety 2012 Student Awareness Initiative is that a Philadelphia trial lawyer’s daughter was killed by  a distracted driver and more than 800 trial lawyers volunteered to speak out in her memory about distracted driving from Hawaii and California to Maine, Texas to North Dakota, Florida to Washington State and many of the provinces of Canada. When our first year’s initiative concludes, Casey’s story and the story of the senseless and needless loss of life from distracted driving, will have been told to more than 40,000 students. By telling Casey’s story and the stories of others killed by distracted driving, we have saved many lives. (more…)

Casey’s College Friend Speaks at Her High School Alma Mater on Distracted Driving

Monday, May 14th, 2012

Brooke Burdge speaking at her high school

By Brooke Burdge

On Friday, April 27, I had the opportunity to visit my alma mater, Communications High School, in Wall Twp., N.J. to speak to over 150 juniors and seniors on the topic of distracted driving. My presentation was one of over a thousand that took place in April as part of End Distracted Driving’s (EndDD.org) campaign for National Distracted Driving Awareness Month.

It was a great experience to be able to help educate young drivers on the various issues associated with distracted driving. At the same time, it was challenging, since I knew the reason I was standing at the front of the room was because of my close connection to this topic– that I lost one of my closest college friends, Casey Feldman, as a result of distracted driving.

I opened up the presentations by introducing the campaign and explaining how big of a difference this program is making in just its first year.  I then gave the background for the presentation, and described Joel Feldman as the inspiration and told Casey’s story.  It was at this point that I showed a few pictures of Casey and I together, and let the students know my connection to this topic.

Brooke (L) and Casey

I was impressed by how focused and engaged the students of CHS were. They actively participated, answering my questions and sharing their stories.  CHS is a “magnet school”– a career academy that draws selected students from across the county.  Many students have long drives to school and to visit their friends from around the county.  I could see this was a topic that resonated with the students.

After my talks, a few students approached me and thanked me for speaking to them.  Some expressed their condolences for losing Casey.  Two girls even told me how they created their own PSA on distracted driving and recently submitted it into a contest.

The school principal graciously invited me back next year to speak again.  I hope to make this April presentation a yearly tradition. By continuing to share Casey’s story and raise awareness of distracted driving, we can help prevent tragedies from happening to others.

Related Links:

EndDD.org (End Distracted Driving)

Communications High School

National Distracted Driving Awareness Month

U.S. Department of Transportation Commends Joel Feldman’s Efforts to End Distracted Driving

End Distracted Driving reaches out with safety message (U.S.DOT’s blog article with photos and video of Casey)

Casey Feldman Memories

Casey Feldman Network

 

U.S. Department of Transportation Commends Joel Feldman’s Efforts to End Distracted Driving

Friday, April 27th, 2012

By Dianne L. Anderson

Ray LaHood, U.S. Secretary of Transportation, dedicated a recent blog article to Joel Feldman’s (Casey’s father) efforts to end distracted driving through amassing some 800 attorneys and judges to speak to students across the country and in Canada. The effort was through EndDD.org, a website sponsored by the Casey Feldman Memorial Foundation and dedicated to ending distracted driving. The presentations coincided with  National Distracted Driving Awareness Month –  April, 2012.

Casey Feldman in U.S. DOT public service video

The following are excerpts from the US DOT website blog:

In February 2011, the father of a young woman who was killed by a distracted driver sent DOT a video tribute to his daughter. Joel Feldman’s powerful video about his daughter Casey was the first outside submission to become part of our Faces of Distracted Driving. And Casey’s story has proven to be one of our most effective videos, capturing the attention of people around the world. …

Since then, Joel Feldman has not rested in his pursuit of that change. The organization he started, End Distracted Driving, has been a strong advocate in our fight to get drivers to keep their eyes on the road, their hands on the wheel, and their full attention on driving safely.

And, in honor of National Distracted Driving Awareness Month, EndDD.org has launched the End Distracted Driving Student Awareness Initiative. This campaign seeks to educate students and other drivers throughout North America about the dangers of distracted driving. Perhaps more importantly, the Student Awareness Initiative gives drivers simple steps to keep them–and others–safe. …

End Distracted Driving has an ambitious goal for its April initiative: to reach more than 100,000 young drivers.

Within days of EndDD announcing the effort, more than 800 attorneys from across the United States and Canada had signed up to give Student Awareness Initiative presentations through high schools and civic groups. Joel Feldman says that Parent Teacher Associations (PTAs) have been particularly open to hosting these presentations….

So I’m thankful that End Distracted Driving’s more than 800 volunteers are working hard throughout National Distracted Driving Awareness Month to spread the important safety message that cell phones and driving don’t mix.

Read the full U.S. DOT blog article here.

Related Links:

U.S. DOT  April 18th blog article

Casey Feldman, U.S. DOT Faces of Distracted Driving Video and Feb. 22, 2011 blog article

EndDD.org (End Distracted Driving)

 National End Distracted Driving Month

Delco, Montco and the Commonwealth of PA Establish Distracted Driving Awareness Month at the Urging of the Casey Feldman Foundation

 

Phi Sigma Pi – Alpha Epsilon Holds 3rd Annual Casey Feldman Benefit Concert April 2012

Sunday, April 15th, 2012

Ryan Gellar (L) and Jimmy Donahue completing forms to commit to safer driving

By Dianne L. Anderson

The West Chester University chapter of the national honors fraternity, Phi Sigma Pi, held the third annual Casey Feldman Memorial Foundation benefit concert on April 14, 2012. Over $1500 in proceeds were raised on behalf of the Foundation.

Donating their musical talents in the ballroom at the Sykes Student Union were Ryan Colestock and the bands, Reservoir and The GoAround. Students paid a $5 donation at the door, and were able to purchase EndDD.org (End Distracted Driving) wristbands, keytags, bumper magnets and t-shirts. All attendees were also able to purchase raffle tickets for goods and services donated by local vendors. “Casey” tables were in place where students could view collages of photographs of Casey.

Phi Sigma Pi brothers don their "Because of Casey" t-shirts

Casey Feldman’s parents, Dianne Anderson and Joel Feldman, spoke to the group about Casey and the fact that a distracted driver struck her while she was in a crosswalk on a summer afternoon at the Jersey shore. Mr. Feldman took the opportunity to introduce the 3 minute video clip of Casey which appears on the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Faces of Distracted website and spoke to the students about the issue of distracted driving.

Stated Mr. Feldman, “As Dianne and I speak with students in high schools and colleges as part of April’s Distracted Driving Awareness Month, we are encouraged by the willingness of young people to examine their driving behaviors and commit to becoming safer drivers. This is the feedback similar to what we have received from the hundreds of trial lawyers around the country and Canada who are also speaking with students as part of the Casey Feldman Foundation’s  www.EndDD.org initiative.”

Joel Feldman gets a hug from Amber Staska, Casey's friend and former Fraternity President who planned the first concert in 2010

The students at the Phi Sigma Pi sponsored concert exhibited the same willingness and completed forms committing to specific concrete actions for driving safer. “Hopefully you can all talk to your parents as well when you go home, since distracted driving is not just a young people’s problem. It is everyone’s” stated Joel.

 

Related Links:

Photos from the 2012 concert

Phi Sigma Pi Alpha Epsilon

Photos and videos from prior years concerts and traffic safety campaigns

All  Foundation articles on Phi Sigma Pi