Casey Feldman Foundation Sponsors Spay/Neuter Day & More at Animal Shelter

By Dianne L. Anderson

Casey had a kind heart, and that kind heart extended not just to humans, but to animals as well.  Among its many endeavors, the Casey Feldman Foundation has sought to honor Casey’s love for  animals in numerous ways. The most recent is a grant to Main Line Animal Rescue (MLAR), through which  a Casey Feldman Foundation Spay/Neuter Day  has been scheduled for this Wednesday, June 11, 2014. As a result of this grant, four to five animals will be spayed and neutered.

Funds from this grant have also supported, Helga, a dog in need of medical care and will establish the “Casey Cam”, a camera installed in the training room to facilitate training classes and further volunteer education of animal training. Casey’s long time friend from Springfield, PA, Rachael Kemmey, who volunteers her time with the Foundation, organized this event and the distribution of funds with MLAR.

Casey's friend, Rachael Kemmey, greets some of the many animals at MLAR in Jan. while touring the facility with Casey's parents

Why spay and neuter? Each day 10,000 humans are born in the U.S. – and each day 70,000 puppies and kittens are born. Nationwide, more than 2.7 million healthy, adoptable cats and dogs are euthanized in shelters annually (The Humane Society of the United States).  This sad and enormous number is as a result of un-spayed and un-neutered animals. One un-spayed female dog and one un-neutered male dog and their offspring can produce 4,372 puppies in 7 years. For cats it is even worse. One un-spayed female cat and one un-neutered male cat and their offspring results in 420,000 kittens in 7 years.

Helga - beautiful, but not happy wearing a cone!

Often, these animals arrive at MLAR and other shelters in need of medical care that goes beyond the basic and routine. Helga is just one of those animals.

A 5 year old German Sheppard who was rescued from a puppy mill, Helga had spent the previous 5 years in a rabbit hutch. She tried to rip off her own tail, which unfortunately had to be removed by the veterinary staff at MLAR. Helga was a spinner, commonly seen in dogs from puppy mills who have been confined in hutches; they spin for stimulation and to self soothe. Because Helga continued to spin after her surgery, trying to get to her absent tail, she was kept in a cone for an extended period of time. Helga was treated with several medications and has worked with a dedicated volunteer to help her gain the confidence needed to overcome her issues. After spending many weeks in the clinic under the watchful eyes of the MLAR medical staff, Helga is now in the main kennel and doing very well. It is not surprising that Helga enjoys exercise, something that was absent in the first 5 years of her life.

A limited number of supporters of the Casey Feldman Memorial Foundation who are animal lovers are invited to attend the event on Wednesday. The schedule is as follows:

Agenda for June 11:

Helga after her surgery

10:00 am – Representatives from the Casey Feldman Foundation arrive at the medical clinic

10:00am – 12:00pm

 Dr. Meg and Megan Anderson (Director of Animal Welfare and Enrichment) will introduce the animals before they go into surgery and share their stories.

 Clinic staff will share additional stories about the other animals currently in the clinic.

 Photos as appropriate

 Bring Helga down from the kennel for a visit.

 12:00pm – lunch will be provided in the development conference room

Spaces are limited. If you would like to attend, please RSVP by Monday, June 8, 2014 by sending an email to DianneAnderson@CaseyFeldmanFoundation.org.

3 of the 4 of Casey's and the Feldman's rescued cats

Please consider making a donation to the Casey Feldman Memorial Foundation so that we may continue our good work in Casey’s memory.

One of the cat lounges at MLAR

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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