Springfield High School Senior Produces New Casey Feldman Documentary

Thursday, January 7th, 2016

Samantha Kemmey was just 6 years old when when her older sister, Rachael, first met Casey Feldman as a freshman in high school. She got to know Casey as a younger sibling would when Casey would frequent the Kemmey household to spend time with Rachael. Eleven years later years later and a now a Springfield High School (SHS) senior, the impact that Casey’s death in 2009 had on Samantha is evident. Hoping to share about the vibrant life lost in a senseless tragedy and raise awareness about the impact of distracted driving,  Samantha produced a documentary for her high school film production class about Casey. The documentary has aired on the SHS morning TV news station each morning for one month. View Samantha’s video here:

Helping me to find gratitude from pain and loss – “She had the same habit as Casey, twirling her hair with her left hand”

Thursday, November 27th, 2014

By Joel. D. Feldman

Casey, Christmas Day 2008

Casey, Christmas Day 2008

I gave a distracted driving talk Tuesday at The Country Day School of the Sacred Heart in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. One of the students was blonde and she looked a little like my daughter, Casey. And she had the same habit as Casey – twirling her hair with her left hand. Following the talk, the school was getting out for Thanksgiving and many were leaving directly with family to travel for the holiday.

As I drove home I thought that if Casey were alive she, like all the girls at the talk, would be coming home to be with us for Thanksgiving. I would always pick her up at the train station in Philadelphia as she came home from college in NYC.  I would see her before she would see me and  I would look forward to that instant when she would first see me and smile – a smile just for her Dad.  I was really feeling down and missing Casey and thinking about how our Thanksgiving would not be so joyous. I thought about how I missed so many things about Casey, including her smile and how she twirled her hair.

Often when I finish a talk and am alone in my car I get emotional but, it was more so on Tuesday. I got home and continued to be deep in thought about how much I missed so many things about her. I thought of all that Casey had lost out on and all that we had lost. It was hard to feel thankful.

Then I received an e-mail from a father of one of the students at the school and it turned everything around for me emotionally. The father’s e-mail included the following:

My daughter just texted me that she found your presentation at her school to be a real eye-opener… she doesn’t text me often to comment on speakers she hears in class, but I think she was deeply moved by your experience, and so I write to you now.

I knew about your upcoming visit from an announcement, and at dinner last night I encouraged my daughter to be receptive to you. I got the usual rolling eye response that she’s heard it all before. She is a senior, and immersed in the more pleasant aspects of her life.

Thank you for making distracted driving an issue that we are all now concerned about. From your own unspeakable personal loss, I am sure that you are preventing many other tragedies. Your work is not only in the highest tradition of the lawyer, but the epitome of a human being who improves the lives of his neighbors.

When I read the email I realized just how much I did have to be thankful for: for my family and friends; for the support of so many wonderful and caring people; for the incredible 21 years I had with Casey;  for that young blonde student whose hair twirling prompted great memories of Casey;  and, for being able to tell Casey’s story everywhere to teens who are passionate, compassionate, energetic and so receptive to my message about distracted driving.

I am also grateful for that father’s email, as it prompted me to count my blessings on this Thanksgiving day.

 

Casey Feldman’s Parents Receive Courageous Advocacy Award in Massachusetts

Tuesday, June 11th, 2013

Casey's parents, Joel Feldman and Dianne Anderson holding a picture of their daughter, Casey, who was killed by a distracted driver in 2009

In creating the Casey Feldman Foundation and EndDD.org and bringing their “End Distracted Driving” (EndDD) message to the public throughout the country, Joel Feldman and Dianne Anderson “have given their daughter a powerful and important legacy,” the Massachusetts Academy of Trial Attorneys (MATA) concluded, recently awarding the couple the group’s 2013 Courageous Advocacy Award.

Casey Feldman was 21 when she was killed by a distracted driver in 2009. MATA recognized her parents, Joel and Dianne, for “their courage, selflessness and commitment to preventing similar tragedies,” calling it “extraordinary.”

“Casey Feldman taught her friends that everyone had a story – both unique and beautiful. She believed that telling someone’s story made a difference—to both the story-teller and their audience. Casey believed that stories change lives. In telling Casey’s story, Joel and Dianne are not only changing peoples’ lives, they are saving them. What could be a more important message and unforgettable tribute to their daughter Casey’s memory,” explained the program for MATA’s Annual Meeting and dinner on May 22nd in Newton, MA.

Feldman accepted the award from MATA President Tim Kelleher, telling the crowd of approximately 400 guests, “We are so appreciative of being honored by MATA and for their hard work to bring our End Distracted Driving presentation to teens in high schools across the state.”

MATA members have taken the EndDD.org presentation to high schools in Massachusetts since the campaign was launched in that state  in March.

“As trial lawyers, we see the awful consequences of distracted driving,” said Feldman, “But our End Distracted Driving program can help prevent these terrible crashes and make a difference in all of our communities.”

Joel Feldman, Casey's father, addressing MATA upon acceptance of the Courageous Advocacy Award

“I can’t bring Casey back, but I can tell her story and have others tell her story so that we all drive safer,” Feldman said.

“In our society, many people are uncomfortable talking about grief and loss and don’t know how to support those who are suffering,” said Feldman. “As trial lawyers, our clients are suffering and not only do we have an obligation to represent our clients , but an obligation as compassionate human beings to offer support that our clients and their families need.”

Related Links:

EndDD Campaign Initiated in Massachusetts at State Capital; Gov Issues Proclamation; H.S. Students Hear Presentation; TV News Coverage, EndDD.org, March 10, 2013

 

Marking Distracted Driving Awareness Month – IN DE AND PA, THE CASEY FELDMAN FOUNDATION’S EndDD.ORG BUILDS SUPPORT

Friday, April 19th, 2013

 

Casey's dad, Joel Feldman, speaking at the PA news conference

DE – L to R: State Police Superintendent Col. Nathaniel McQueen Jr., Joel Feldman, Governor Jack Markell, Lieutenant Governor Matthew Denn, Tim Lengkeek, President – Delaware Trial Lawyers, Lisa Donofrio, Executive Director, Delaware Trial Lawyers

With a Governor, Lt. Governor, Attorney General and state lawmakers joining the cause, EndDD.org reached out to drivers and their passengers in Delaware and Pennsylvania, especially teenagers, with an urgent and life-saving warning to change their driving habits and stop driving distracted.

In separate news conferences in Wilmington, DE and Harrisburg, PA last week, EndDD.org founder Joel Feldman told the story of his 21-year-old daughter Casey, who was killed by a distracted driver. Feldman and his wife, Dianne Anderson, created The Casey Feldman Foundation and EndDD.org, a project of the foundation, to honor Casey’s life and save others.

“While I can’t bring Casey back, I can tell her story so that teens and adults will drive safer,” said Feldman, who worked with traffic safety, mental health and other experts to develop the EndDD.org interactive presentation that will be seen by more than 200,000 teens in 35 states this year.

In Wilmington, Feldman and EndDD.org supporters were joined by Governor Jack Markell, Lt. Governor Matt Denn, and State Police Superintendent Colonel Nathaniel McQueen, Jr. at a news conference hosted by the Delaware Trial Lawyers Association. That day, the state launched its second wave of cellphone enforcement, issuing tickets to drivers seen talking or texting on a cell phone. The Delaware Office of Highway Safety reported 1,718 crashes in 2012 due to distracted driving, one was fatal. Governor Markell made it clear that his office is committed to seeing that every teen in Delaware participate in the EndDD presentation.

DE – L: Governor Jack Markell, Joel Feldman and Lt. Governor Matt Denn sporting EndDD wristbands

“I was amazed by how many Delaware trial lawyers attended the news conference and stayed for a training session afterwards so that they could go out in their own communities and educate young drivers about the dangers of distracted driving,” said Joel Feldman.

In Harrisburg, Feldman joined State Attorney General Kathleen Kane, Auditor General Eugene DePasquale, State Sen. Rob Teplitz, D-Dauphin County, Rep. Brandon Neuman, D-Washington and the Pennsylvania Association of Justice (PAJ). Sen. Teplitz and Rep. Neuman sponsored resolutions, passed unanimously in both houses, making April, “Distracted Driving Awareness Month.”

“Distracted driving takes a terrible toll on our families, communities and safety,” said Sen. Neuman. “It is my hope that educating everyone about the importance of safe driving habits will begin to change driving habits that caused 387,000 injuries and 3,331 deaths in 2011.”

“It is crucial to public safety that we continue to remind motorists to keep both eyes on the road and both hands on the wheel,” said Rep. Teplitz. “Just one moment of distraction can change the lives of not only a driver, but passengers, surrounding drivers and pedestrians, as well as their loved ones. No text message is worth risking lives.”

PA – L to R: Rep. Brandon Neuman , Mike Davey (PAJ), Joel Feldman, Scott Cooper (PAJ Pres.) and State Sen. Rob Teplitz

Rep. Teplitz praised Feldman and his family for “their leadership on this critical issue.”

“After he lost his daughter, Joel Feldman changed his own driving habits and committed himself to educating others nationwide about the dangers of distracted driving, especially teens,” Rep. Teplitz said.

“The (EndDD.org) presentation is heart-wrenching, powerful, and illuminating,” Sen. Neuman said. “It will challenge every mind and leave no heart untouched.”

Attorney General Kathleen Kane said, “It is critical that everyone, but especially teenagers who are just forming good driving habits that will last a lifetime, understands that driving while distracted is terrible dangerous…I am glad that the EndDD program is being show in high schools across Pennsylvania, and I’m proud to help make April “End Distracted Driving Month” in Pennsylvania.”

PA Attorney General Kathleen Kane speaking at the press conference

PAJ President Scott Cooper and Mike Davey, President of the News Lawyers Division of the PAJ, have committed their members to carry the EndDD program throughout the state.

Read more about the EndDD.org news conferences:

Pennsylvania:

Lawmakers, Victim’s Father Warn of Distracted Driving Dangers (Also view full video coverage of entire PA news conference here)

Father uses daughter’s story to tell dangers of distracted driving

Lawmakers, Victim’s Father Warn of Distracted Driving Dangers 

Father tries to prevent distracted driving (FOX News video)

PA Legislators recognize April as ‘Distracted Driving Awareness’ month  (News 21 video)

PA Auditor General Eugene DePasquale speaking at the news conference

 

 

 Delaware:

Father who lost daughter to distracted motorist leads effort

 

 

 

5K Run/Walk this Sunday Benefiting the Casey Feldman Foundation/EndDD.org – Register or Donate

Wednesday, April 17th, 2013

The West Chester University Alpha Epsilon Chapter of the national honors fraternity, Phi Sigma Pi, will be hosting a 5K walk/run this Sunday, April 21, 2013 as its fourth annual fundraiser for the Casey Feldman Foundation (sponsor of EndDD.org.). Since it is Distracted Driving Awareness Month and Casey was killed by a distracted driver, the fraternity hopes to raise awareness of the dangers of distracted driving.

Phi Sigma Pi has been a supporter of the Casey Feldman Memorial Foundation, holding an annual fundraiser for the Foundation since 2010. At the time of Casey’s death in July of 2009, Casey’s best friend from high school, Amber Staska, was President elect of the fraternity for the 2009-2010 school year. Casey’s close friend, Phil Knasiak, was Vice President.

The three past benefits have been in the form of a concert at West Chester University with an on- campus pedestrian safety and and distracted driving awareness campaign in the week leading up to the concert. The effort received national recognition the first year when Phi Sigm Pi’s President was featured in Seventeen Magazine.

Casey Feldman (R) with Amber Staska, Casey's best friend from high school and President of Phi Sigma Pi in 2010

The fraternity recently inducted Casey’s parents, Joel Feldman and Dianne Anderson as honorary brothers and have adopted the Casey Feldman Foundation as their annual charitable cause.

This year’s 5K event will take place on the West Chester University South Campus in Lot S, West Chester, PA.  Check- in is 10:15-10:45 and the race starts at 11:00 a.m. Click here for online registration and directions or here to view the event details on Facebook

If you cannot attend, please consider making a donation to the Casey Feldman Foundation so that we may continue to make a difference in the lives of others and save lives through our distracted driving efforts.

Click here to view the articles, photos and videos from the prior three Phi Sigma Pi fundraisers.

 

Distracted Driving Awareness Month guest contributor Joel Feldman: Celebrating my daughter’s 25th birthday

Wednesday, April 10th, 2013

Article by Joel Feldman, guest contributor, reprinted from the U.S. Secretary of Transportation (US.DOT), Ray Lahood’s official blog, Fast Lane:

Pink balloons were released to mark Casey's 25th birthday

Pink balloons were released to mark Casey’s 25th birthday

Apr 10, 2013 – This past weekend, on April 6, we celebrated my daughter Casey’s 25th birthday. But Casey wasn’t there. She was killed in 2009 by a distracted driver, a 58-year-old man behind the wheel of a van. He took his eyes off the road for just a few seconds. Pink was Casey’s favorite color, so we released pink balloons in her memory. As the balloons drifted upwards, I thought of her smile, the last time I heard her say “daddy,” how caring, compassionate, and loving she was, and her incredible zest for life. I also thought of her last moments, how she suffered, how afraid she must have been, and the last words she spoke before she died: “I want my mom.”

Following Casey’s death, our family established the Casey Feldman Foundation and created “End Distracted Driving.” We are keeping Casey’s memory alive through EndDD.org by raising awareness about distracted driving and changing driver behaviors – especially among young people. We want to spare other families from the suffering we have endured.

Two years ago, Casey became one of Secretary LaHood’s “Faces of Distracted Driving.” I created the video to share the story of Casey’s life and death with the world, and I was proud to see it become the first public submission in the “Faces” series.

Distracted Driving Awareness Month guest contributor Joel Feldman

Distracted Driving Awareness Month guest contributor Joel Feldman

Today, that same video is the centerpiece of EndDD.org’s Student Awareness Initiative. We worked with experts to develop this interactive presentation with the goal of changing driving attitudes and behaviors of teens and their parents. By the end of 2013, nearly 200,000 people – mostly teenagers – in more than 40 states will have participated in the EndDD.org program.

Nearly all the teens we work with tell me that their parents drive distracted with them in the car, and their friends’ parents do the same when they’re carpooling. I know I drove distracted with my children in the car before Casey was killed. That changed with her death.

I’m encouraged because what drivers consider acceptable behavior behind the wheel is starting to change, especially because of young people. They are “getting it” – much as an earlier generation learned the importance of using seat belts and convinced their parents to buckle up. Young people are working with moms and dads to adopt safe driving rules for the entire family. Young people are helping to change our entire driving culture.

People often tell me how brave I am to speak publicly about my daughter. But I don’t feel very brave. I just feel that I have to do this, so Casey’s life and death will make a difference for others.

It took Casey’s death for me to change the way I drive. But I hope it won’t take personal tragedies for others to get the message. I am optimistic we all can “get it”, even as we celebrate Casey’s birthday without her.

 

Casey’s Friend, Brooke Burdge, Shares Her Story with Local NJ Teens in Distracted Driving Presentation

Sunday, March 17th, 2013

The following is a guest blog by Brooke Burdge, a friend of Casey’s during her time at Fordham University.

 

Brooke Burdge with students from Monmouth Regional High School who are involved in efforts to help promote safe driving within their own school community.

On March 11, I had the opportunity to speak with close to 1,000 students and faculty at Monmouth Regional High School in Tinton Falls, New Jersey on the topic of distracted driving. My presentation was part of  the EndDD.org End Distracted Driving Student Awareness Initiative, which since its inception in 2012, has reached over 60,000 high school students.

At the start of my presentation, I gave a brief overview of EndDD’s mission, as well as some background on the inspiration for these presentations. I described how in the summer of 2009, an attorney and father named Joel Feldman from Pennsylvania got the news that his 21-year-old daughter, Casey, was struck and killed by a distracted driver while she was a pedestrian in a crosswalk on her way to her summer job in Ocean City, New Jersey. I told them how he then established the Casey Feldman Foundation in memory of his daughter and created EndDD.org  and the distracted driving presentation to educate others about the dangers of distracted driving.

Brooke (L) and Casey in a photo taken during their time together at Fordham University

Then, I let the group know a little more about me. Like them, I grew up in Monmouth County, NJ.  After graduating from a nearby high school in 2006, I went on to Fordham University, where I made a great friend named Casey.  This is the moment where I showed them a slide with photos of Casey and myself throughout our time together, as well as two Facebook wall posts from Casey. In this moment, the audience realized my direct connection to this cause and the root of my passion for this issue.

Later in the presentation, I showed the students the “Faces of Distracted Driving” video created for the U.S. Department of Transportation, in which a few of Casey’s friends and I talk about the preventable nature of Casey’s tragedy.  I explained to the students that you tend to see these types of videos and think, “Something like this couldn’t happen to me or my friends,” but those are all my good friends on that screen, and it’s very real to each of us.

Brooke (L) and Casey working for The Observer at the Fordham reunion in June 2008

Throughout the presentation, I reminded the group of three main points.  First, this is not just a teen problem. Adults are also guilty. I shared that before July 2009, I was also guilty of distracted driving. Secondly, I let them know that this is a choice. I wasn’t there to tell them what they should or should not be doing. I was there to give them information, and share a few stories, that they can take into consideration when making their own choices behind the wheel. And third, I reminded that that yes, these stories are sad, but they’re preventable. I wanted them to understand that although what happened to Casey and others they would hear about is extremely upsetting, it didn’t have to happen. I wanted everyone in the room to walk away feeling like they were in a position to help stop future tragedies like these from taking place.

Before the presentation, over 400 students had completed questionnaires about distracted driving. I covered the forms of distracted driving they had mentioned most frequently in their surveys—taking eyes off the road, texting, talking on the phone. But, I also wanted them to think more about the other kinds of distracted driving that may not come to mind as frequently, but are just as dangerous, such as eating, changing music, applying makeup, programing a GPS, and reaching for something.

Brooke Burdge speaking to students at Monmouth Regional High School in NJ. Photo Credit: Samantha Primich

We discussed the importance of speaking up for your own safety when a passenger in an adult’s or a friend’s car—how you can offer to take your driver’s phone and cover any calls or texts for them while their driving.  Through various stories about the numerous consequences of distracted driving, I hoped to drive home the point that this is sad, but preventable. Just a few seconds can change everything, and in the end, are those few seconds of distraction really worth the consequences?

I want to thank those faculty and students who helped organize this assembly.  Additionally, I want to thank every student and faculty member in that room for their attention.  A handful of students have reached out to me on social media since the assembly, and I am so happy that this presentation helped them think about distracted driving in a new light.

NOTE:  View photos from the presentation here. View Brooke Burdge and Casey’s other friends  in the Faces of Distracted Driving video below speaking about Casey and how they changed they driving habits after Casey’s death. View U.S. Secretary of Transportation, Ray LaHood’s blog article introducing the video.

Premier Release of “Just a Few Seconds” Distracted Driving PSA Video Produced by Casey’s Father

Wednesday, February 6th, 2013

“I wasn’t texting, I wasn’t using my cell phone, but I still killed someone”, says 17 year old Kate, in the new PSA video produced by Casey’s father, Joel Feldman, now incorporated into the www.EndDD.org (Casey Feldman Foundation website) distracted driving presentation. This is one of the first distracted driving videos which features both the driver and the victim’s family. Howard Stein, 61 years old, was soon to be a grandfather; his daughter Emily, also featured in the video, was newly married and 6 months pregnant at the time of her father’s death. “I knew he was going to be such a fantastic grandfather,” says Emily. View the 3 minute video:

The accident occurred in Massachusetts and the video was premiered at a press conference in Boston at the State House on Feb. 4th. In conjunction with the release of the video, Massachusetts’s Governor Deval Patrick declared Feb. 4th as Distracted Driving Awareness Day.  The Massachusetts’s Academy of Trial Attorneys (MATA) participated and announced their plan to take the EndDD driving presentation to schools throughout Massachusetts.

The EndDD.org distracted driving presentation which included the new PSA video, was kicked off the following day in Mass. at Medford High School outside of Boston.

Related Links:

Photos

EndDD.org – End Distracted Driving (Casey Feldman Foundation sponsored website)

“Father takes distracted driving cause to Mass”,  by Jeff Wolfe,  Daily Times, Feb. 4, 2013

“End Distracted Driving Campaign Kicks Off at MHS”, Medford Public Schools

“Gov. Patrick declares “Distracted Driving Day’ as Mass. lawyers discuss dangers of distracted driving”, Metro (Boston)

“Abruptly, a life ends, another shatters; A teen works to make amends for a moment of deadly distraction”,  by Tim O’Brien, TimesUnion, Albany, NY (Feb. 16, 2013)

MATA

 

 

 

 

Painting your toe nails while driving? Putting in contact lenses? Colorado teens speak up as CO Trial Lawyers join the EndDD effort

Saturday, February 2nd, 2013

By Dianne L. Anderson

 

Say what?! Yes, distracted driving comes in all shapes and as many colors as nail polish. In addition to the Casey Feldman Foundation’s philanthropy in awarding scholarships and grants to students and organizations, the Foundation is committed to ending distracted driving through its sponsored site, EndDD.org.

Casey Feldman was killed by a distracted driver in 2009 while crossing the street in a crosswalk at an intersection governed by 4-way stop signs. Joel Feldman, Casey Feldman’s father, is spreading the word nationwide and the Colorado Trial Lawyers Association  (CTLA) is just one of 13 state organizations (in addition to Canada) which has taken up the cause and has committed its members to taking the EndDD.org presentation to teens in their communities. Some 60,000 students nationwide have seen the presentation since its inception in the Spring of 2012 and Feldman estimates that some 200,000 will have seen it by the end of this year.

Feldman holds a picture of his daughter, Casey, while he discusses the dangers of distracted driving during a driver education class at Longmont High School on Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013.(Greg Lindstrom/Times-Call)

The presentation was developed by Joel Feldman with the help of researchers, traffic safety experts and teen messaging experts to maximize teen engagement.  Feldman has personally given the presentation to more than 7,000 teens across the country and has given 9 presentations in Colorado since January 9, 2013, reaching some 600 Colorado teens in the Denver, Boulder and Longmont area thus far. Joel is working with the CTLA to implement the program throughout the state and is providing training to its lawyers so that the message will continue to be spread.

As a result of his efforts in Colorado, Feldman received the CTLA 2013 Consumer Protection Award.  “CTLA is proud to honor Joel with the Consumer Protection Award,” said John Sadwith, executive director at CTLA.  “Joel and his wife, Dianne, share their tragedy to get teenagers thinking and their families talking about distracted driving.  Our members want to help them succeed in saving lives.”  Stated Feldman, “It is particularly gratifying to receive this award from the Colorado Trial Lawyers Association. Our son Brett will graduate from the University of Colorado Boulder this year and wants to make Colorado his permanent home.  My wife and I love the Boulder/Denver area where we have made many new friends since working with the University on a number of projects over the last 4 years.”

The EndDD presentation is comprehensive and covers all forms of distracted driving, not just cell phone usage, which is attributed to less than 1/4 of distracted driving crashes as of 2009 data.  “We do not want teens to have a false sense of security that if they are not using their cell phone, they are driving distraction free”, said Joel.

While teens across the country have recognized cell phone usage, eating, drinking, grooming, operating a GPS, talking to others in their vehicle and viewing roadside activity, as distractions, the Colorado teens added a few additional personal examples. Said one  teen, “My cousin is thin and very flexible and she actually had her foot up on the steering wheel and was painting her toenails as she was driving!  I was terrified.” Added another, “My mom was driving me while she put her contact lenses in her eyes! I was scared to death!”

Feldman has continued to affirm that distracted driving is not just a teen problem, but is everyone’s problem. “ In all of my presentations, the vast majority of the students report  that their parents drive distracted with them in the car. I have been so impressed with the Colorado teens who I have spoken with. They are bright, engaged and really want to drive safely. I am convinced that they will avoid many driving distractions and will also work to get their moms and dads to drive safer. Their generation will change our driving culture, just as our generation changed the culture regarding seat belt usage,” said Feldman.

Related Links:

EndDD.org (End Distracted Driving – Casey Feldman Foundation sponsored site)

Colorado Trial Lawyers Association – Community Outreach: Distracted Driving Program 

“Grieving father fights distracted driving in St. Vrain discussion”,  The Times Call, Longmont, CO 1-9-2013

“Reaching out in our communities to keep our children safe: The 2012-13 EndDD,org High School Distracted Driving Awareness Program”, by Joel D. Feldman,  Colorado Trial Lawyers Association Trial Talk,  Aug/Sept 2012

United States Department of Transportration/National Highway Traffic Administration (NHTSA),  “Distracted Driving 2009” Traffic Safety Facts Research Note,  Sept 2010

CU Students Fight Distracted Driving With New Video

Saturday, January 5th, 2013

By Joel D. Feldman

University of Colorado students are taking aim against distracted driving and pedestrian injuries on campus. Working with the Wardenburg Health Center, CU students produced a video which explores the types of distracted driving they have witnessed, some reasons why people might drive distracted and some simple suggestions to drive less distracted. The video is part of an initiative to raise awareness on the CU campus about distracted driving, and also distracted walking and pedestrian safety.

The Casey Feldman Foundation is working with the CU students and CU students will participate in upcoming EndDD.org distracted driving presentations to Colorado high school students. The CU students are also working in conjunction with the Bacchus network,  a leader in college safety programs with funding provided by the Colorado DOT.  The events will culminate in a state-wide Colorado Distracted Driving Summit to be held in May of 2013.

View the video on YouTube.

Related Links:

CU Distracted Driving Video

EndDD.org (End Distracted Driving, a Casey Feldman Foundation sponsored site)

University of Colorado Boulder

Bacchus Network